Intentionally causing harassment, alarm or distress
3.—(1)  No person shall, with intent to cause harassment, alarm or distress to another person, by any means —
(a)use any threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour; or
(b)make any threatening, abusive or insulting communication,
thereby causing that other person or any other person (each referred to for the purposes of this section as the victim) harassment, alarm or distress.
(2)  Any person who contravenes subsection (1) shall be guilty of an offence and, subject to section 8, shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $5,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or to both.
(3)  In any proceedings for an offence under subsection (2), it is a defence for the accused person to prove that his conduct was reasonable.
Illustrations
(a)  X and Y are co‑workers. At the workplace, X loudly and graphically describes to the other co‑workers X’s desire for a sexual relationship with Y in an insulting manner. X knows that Y is within earshot and intends to cause Y distress. Y is distressed. X is guilty of an offence under this section.
(b)  X writes a letter containing threatening words towards Y intending to send the letter to Y to cause him alarm. X decides not to send the letter and throws it away. Y finds the letter and is alarmed. X is not guilty of an offence under this section as he had no reason to believe that the letter would be seen by Y.
Harassment, alarm or distress
4.—(1)  No person shall by any means —
(a)use any threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour; or
(b)make any threatening, abusive or insulting communication,
which is heard, seen or otherwise perceived by any person (referred to for the purposes of this section as the victim) likely to be caused harassment, alarm or distress.
(2)  Any person who contravenes subsection (1) shall be guilty of an offence and, subject to section 8, shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $5,000.
(3)  In any proceedings for an offence under subsection (2), it is a defence for the accused person to prove —
(a)that he had no reason to believe that the words or behaviour used, or the communication made, by him would be heard, seen or otherwise perceived by the victim; or
(b)that his conduct was reasonable.
Illustration
X and Y are classmates. X posts a vulgar tirade against Y on a website accessible to all of their classmates. One of Y’s classmates shows the message on the website to Y, and Y is distressed. X is guilty of an offence under this section.