REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE
GOVERNMENT GAZETTE
ACTS SUPPLEMENT
Published by Authority

NO. 39]Friday, November 9 [2018

The following Act was passed by Parliament on 20 October 2018 and assented to by the President on 31 October 2018:—
Supreme Court of Judicature (Amendment No. 2) Act 2018

(No. 46 of 2018)


I assent.

HALIMAH YACOB,
President.
31 October 2018.
An Act to amend the Supreme Court of Judicature Act (Chapter 322 of the 2007 Revised Edition) and to make a related amendment to the State Courts Act (Chapter 321 of the 2007 Revised Edition).
Be it enacted by the President with the advice and consent of the Parliament of Singapore, as follows:
Short title and commencement
1.  This Act is the Supreme Court of Judicature (Amendment No. 2) Act 2018 and comes into operation on a date that the Minister appoints by notification in the Gazette.
New section 8A
2.  The Supreme Court of Judicature Act (called in this Act the principal Act) is amended by inserting, immediately after section 8, the following section:
Court may conduct hearing through electronic means of communication
8A.—(1)  Without limiting section 8, the court may conduct the hearing of any matter or proceeding through a live video link, a live television link or any other electronic means of communication.
(2)  Subsection (1) does not affect the operation of section 62A of the Evidence Act (Cap. 97) and section 281 of the Criminal Procedure Code (Cap. 68).”.
Amendment of section 21
3.  Section 21(1) of the principal Act is amended by deleting “$50,000” in paragraph (a) and substituting “$60,000”.
Amendment of section 30
4.  Section 30 of the principal Act is amended by deleting subsection (2) and substituting the following subsection:
(2)  Despite subsection (1), the Court of Appeal in the exercise of its civil jurisdiction is duly constituted for the purpose of hearing and determining a matter specified in the Sixth Schedule, if it consists of the number of Judges of Appeal specified for that matter in that Schedule.”.
Amendment of section 34
5.  Section 34 of the principal Act is amended —
(a)by deleting subsections (1), (2) and (2A) and substituting the following subsections:
(1)  An appeal cannot be brought to the Court of Appeal in any case specified in paragraph 1 of the Fourth Schedule except where provided in that Schedule.
(2)  An appeal may be brought to the Court of Appeal in any of the following cases only with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal unless otherwise provided in the Fifth Schedule:
(a)any case where the amount in dispute, or the value of the subject‑matter, at the hearing before the High Court (excluding interest and costs) does not exceed $250,000 or such other amount as may be specified by an order made under subsection (3);
(b)any case specified in paragraph 1 of the Fifth Schedule.
(2A)  In addition, an appeal may be brought to the Court of Appeal in any case set out in section 73A(9), 73B(5), 73C(6), 73D(6) or 74(2A) only with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal.”; and
(b)by deleting subsections (4) to (8) and substituting the following subsection:
(4)  An appeal may be brought to the Court of Appeal in any case specified in paragraph 2 of the Fifth Schedule only with the leave of a Judge of the Family Division of the High Court, or of the Court of Appeal unless otherwise provided in that Schedule.”.
Repeal and re‑enactment of section 34A
6.  Section 34A of the principal Act is repealed and the following section substituted therefor:
Court of Appeal may decide certain matters without hearing oral arguments
34A.—(1)  The Court of Appeal may, without hearing oral arguments, decide any application to that Court, whether under this Act or any other written law.
(2)  The Court of Appeal may, with the consent of every party to an appeal from any judgment or order of the Singapore International Commercial Court, decide that appeal without hearing oral arguments.
(3)  To avoid doubt, this section does not affect the power of the Court of Appeal to hear oral arguments before deciding —
(a)any application mentioned in subsection (1); or
(b)any appeal mentioned in subsection (2).”.
New section 34B
7.  The principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately before section 35, the following section:
Summary dismissal of certain matters
34B.—(1)  The Court of Appeal may, on its own motion, summarily dismiss any appeal or application, or any part of an appeal or application.
(2)  The Court of Appeal may exercise its power under subsection (1) only if it is satisfied of either or both of the following matters:
(a)the Court of Appeal does not have jurisdiction to hear and determine the appeal, application or part of an appeal or application mentioned in subsection (1);
(b)there is no merit in the appeal, application or part of an appeal or application mentioned in subsection (1), because every issue in that appeal, application or part of an appeal or application has already been decided by the Court of Appeal, in an earlier matter in which the appellant or applicant was involved.
(3)  The requirement under subsection (2) does not apply to any appeal or application, or any part of an appeal or application, that is prescribed by Rules of Court.
(4)  Before summarily dismissing any appeal, application or part of an appeal or application under subsection (1), the Court of Appeal must —
(a)give the appellant or applicant a reasonable opportunity to show cause why that appeal, application or part of an appeal or application should not be dismissed; and
(b)consider the representations (if any) of the appellant or applicant.
(5)  The Court of Appeal may exercise its powers under this section without hearing oral arguments.”.
Repeal and re‑enactment of section 36
8.  Section 36 of the principal Act is repealed and the following section substituted therefor:
Incidental directions and interim orders
36.—(1)  In any appeal or application pending before the Court of Appeal (called in this section the pending matter), the Court of Appeal may, on its own motion or on the application of any party, at any time make one or more of the following directions and orders:
(a)any direction incidental to the pending matter not involving the decision of the pending matter;
(b)any interim order to prevent prejudice to the claims of the parties pending the determination of the pending matter;
(c)any order for security for costs, and for the dismissal of the pending matter for default in furnishing security so ordered.
(2)  Despite section 30(1), the Court of Appeal is duly constituted to make any direction or order mentioned in subsection (1) if it consists of —
(a)one Judge of Appeal; or
(b)2 Judges of Appeal.
(3)  The Court of Appeal may discharge or vary any direction or order made under subsection (1) by a Court of Appeal consisting of one Judge of Appeal.
(4)  Despite section 30(1), the Court of Appeal is duly constituted to discharge or vary any direction or order mentioned in subsection (3) if it consists of 2 Judges of Appeal.
(5)  An application to discharge or vary any direction or order mentioned in subsection (3) may be made only with the leave of a Judge of Appeal.
(6)  An order of a Judge of Appeal giving or refusing leave under subsection (5) is final.”.
Amendment of section 37
9.  Section 37 of the principal Act is amended —
(a)by deleting the words “on interlocutory applications, or” in subsection (3); and
(b)by deleting subsection (4) and substituting the following subsection:
(4)  Except as provided in subsection (3), such further evidence may be given only on special grounds and with the leave of the Court of Appeal.”.
New sub‑heading to Part VII and new sections 73A to 73D
10.  Part VII of the principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately after section 73, the following sub‑heading and sections:
Measures for dealing with
unmeritorious or vexatious proceedings
and vexatious litigants
Measures for dealing with unmeritorious or vexatious proceedings
73A.—(1)  A court may, in respect of any legal proceedings in the court —
(a)make a limited civil restraint order in accordance with section 73B;
(b)make an extended civil restraint order in accordance with section 73C; or
(c)make a general civil restraint order in accordance with section 73D.
(2)  A court may, if satisfied that a party is conducting any legal proceedings in the court in a vexatious manner, order that those proceedings be stayed on such terms as the court considers appropriate.
(3)  A court may, if satisfied that the filing of further documents by a party in any legal proceedings in the court would be vexatious or for an improper purpose, order that no further documents be filed by that party in relation to those proceedings.
(4)  The High Court may, in respect of any legal proceedings in any subordinate court —
(a)make a limited civil restraint order in accordance with section 73B;
(b)make an extended civil restraint order in accordance with section 73C; or
(c)make a general civil restraint order in accordance with section 73D.
(5)  The High Court may, if satisfied that a party is conducting any legal proceedings in any subordinate court in a vexatious manner, order that those proceedings be stayed on such terms as the High Court considers appropriate.
(6)  The High Court may, if satisfied that the filing of further documents by a party in any legal proceedings in any subordinate court would be vexatious or for an improper purpose, order that no further documents be filed by that party in relation to those proceedings.
(7)  A court may, on the court’s own motion, or on the application of —
(a)the Attorney‑General; or
(b)any party in any legal proceedings in the court,
make an order mentioned in subsection (1)(a), (b) or (c), (2) or (3) against another party in those legal proceedings after giving the other party an opportunity to be heard.
(8)  The High Court may, on the application of —
(a)the Attorney‑General; or
(b)any party in any legal proceedings in a subordinate court,
make an order mentioned in subsection (4)(a), (b) or (c), (5) or (6) against another party in those legal proceedings after giving the other party an opportunity to be heard.
(9)  Subject to section 34(2A), a party against whom the High Court makes an order mentioned in subsection (1)(a), (b) or (c), (2), (3), (4)(a), (b) or (c), (5) or (6) may bring an appeal from the order to the Court of Appeal.
(10)  In this section and sections 73B and 73C, “legal proceedings” includes any proceedings, process, action, application or appeal in any civil matter or quasi‑criminal matter.
Limited civil restraint orders
73B.—(1)  A court may, if satisfied that a party has made 2 or more applications that are totally without merit, make a limited civil restraint order against the party.
(2)  Where a court makes a limited civil restraint order, the party against whom the order is made —
(a)is restrained from making any further application in the legal proceedings in respect of which the order is made without the leave of that court; and
(b)may apply to amend, vary or discharge the order, only if the party has the leave of that court to make that application.
(3)  Where a party, who is subject to a limited civil restraint order, makes an application (other than for the leave of the court under subsection (2)) in the legal proceedings in respect of which the order is made without the leave of the court under subsection (2), that application is to be treated as dismissed —
(a)without the court having to make any further order; and
(b)without the need for any other party to be heard on the merits of that application.
(4)  A limited civil restraint order —
(a)is limited to the particular legal proceedings in respect of which the order is made; and
(b)remains in effect for the duration of the legal proceedings in respect of which the order is made, unless the court orders otherwise.
(5)  Where a party, who is subject to a limited civil restraint order made by the High Court, applies for the leave of the court under subsection (2), and the High Court refuses such leave, the party may, subject to section 34(2A), bring an appeal from the order refusing such leave to the Court of Appeal.
Extended civil restraint orders
73C.—(1)  A court may, if satisfied that a party has persistently commenced actions or made applications that are totally without merit, make an extended civil restraint order against the party.
(2)  Where a court makes an extended civil restraint order, the party against whom the order is made —
(a)is restrained from commencing any action or making any application, in any court or subordinate court specified in the order, concerning any matter involving, relating to, touching upon or leading to the legal proceedings in respect of which the order is made, without the leave of the court that made the order; and
(b)may apply to amend, vary or discharge the order, only if the party has the leave of the court that made the order to make that application.
(3)  Where a party, who is subject to an extended civil restraint order, commences an action or makes an application (other than for the leave of the court under subsection (2)), in any court or subordinate court specified in the order, concerning any matter involving, relating to, touching upon or leading to the legal proceedings in respect of which the order is made, without the leave of the court under subsection (2), that action or application is to be treated as struck out or dismissed —
(a)without the court having to make any further order; and
(b)without the need for any other party to be heard on the merits of that action or application.
(4)  An extended civil restraint order —
(a)remains in effect for a period (not exceeding 2 years) that is specified in the order; and
(b)must specify every court or subordinate court in which the party against whom the order is made is restrained from commencing any action or making any application.
(5)  The court —
(a)may extend the period for which an extended civil restraint order remains in effect, if the court considers it appropriate to do so; but
(b)must not extend that period for more than 2 years on any given occasion.
(6)  Where a party, who is subject to an extended civil restraint order made by the High Court, applies for the leave of the court under subsection (2), and the High Court refuses such leave, the party may, subject to section 34(2A), bring an appeal from the order refusing such leave to the Court of Appeal.
General civil restraint orders
73D.—(1)  A court may, if satisfied that a party has persisted in commencing actions or making applications that are totally without merit, in circumstances where an extended civil restraint order would not be sufficient or appropriate, make a general civil restraint order against the party.
(2)  Where a court makes a general civil restraint order, the party against whom the order is made —
(a)is restrained from commencing any action or making any application, in any court or subordinate court specified in the order, without the leave of the court that made the order; and
(b)may apply to amend, vary or discharge the order, only if the party has the leave of the court that made the order to make that application.
(3)  Where a party, who is subject to a general civil restraint order, commences an action or makes an application (other than for the leave of the court under subsection (2)), in any court or subordinate court specified in the order, without the leave of the court under subsection (2), that action or application is to be treated as struck out or dismissed —
(a)without the court having to make any further order; and
(b)without the need for any other party to be heard on the merits of that action or application.
(4)  A general civil restraint order —
(a)remains in effect for a period (not exceeding 2 years) that is specified in the order; and
(b)must specify every court or subordinate court in which the party against whom the order is made is restrained from commencing any action or making any application.
(5)  The court —
(a)may extend the period for which a general civil restraint order remains in effect, if the court considers it appropriate to do so; but
(b)must not extend that period for more than 2 years on any given occasion.
(6)  Where a party, who is subject to a general civil restraint order made by the High Court, applies for the leave of the court under subsection (2), and the High Court refuses such leave, the party may, subject to section 34(2A), bring an appeal from the order refusing such leave to the Court of Appeal.”.
Amendment of section 74
11.  Section 74 of the principal Act is amended —
(a)by inserting, immediately after subsection (2), the following subsection:
(2A)  A person against whom the High Court makes an order under subsection (1) may bring an appeal from the order to the Court of Appeal only with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal.”;
(b)by deleting the words “an order under subsection (1) refusing leave” in subsection (3) and substituting the words “an order refusing leave under subsection (1)”; and
(c)by inserting, immediately after the words “civil matter” in subsection (5), the words “, quasi‑criminal matter”.
Amendment of sub‑heading to Part VII
12.  Part VII of the principal Act is amended by deleting the word “officers” in the sub‑heading immediately above section 79 and substituting the word “persons”.
Amendment of section 79
13.  Section 79 of the principal Act is amended by deleting the word “officers” in the section heading and substituting the word “persons”.
Amendment of section 80
14.  Section 80 of the principal Act is amended —
(a)by deleting the words “the mode in which evidence thereof may be given” in subsection (2)(h) and substituting the words “the manner in which any factual, expert or opinion evidence may be adduced”;
(b)by deleting the word “; and” at the end of subsection (2)(p) and substituting a full‑stop;
(c)by deleting paragraph (q) of subsection (2); and
(d)by deleting the words “section 34(1)(e)” in subsection (2A)(i) and substituting the words “paragraph 1 of the Fourth Schedule”.
Amendment of section 83
15.  Section 83 of the principal Act is amended —
(a)by deleting the words “Fourth or Fifth” in subsection (1) and substituting the words “Fourth, Fifth or Sixth”; and
(b)by deleting the words “, Fourth and Fifth” in the section heading and substituting the words “to Sixth”.
Amendment of First Schedule
16.  The First Schedule to the principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately after paragraph 21, the following paragraph:
Late filing charge
22.  Power, in any case where a person fails to file any document within the period (for the filing of that document) specified in any order or direction of a court, any Rules of Court or any practice directions issued by the Registrar, to require the person to pay a late filing charge, of such amount as may be prescribed in the Rules of Court, for each day, after the expiry of that period, that that document remains unfiled.”.
Deletion and substitution of Fourth and Fifth Schedules
17.  The Fourth and Fifth Schedules to the principal Act are deleted and the following Schedules substituted therefor:
FOURTH SCHEDULE
Sections 34(1), 80(2A)(i) and 83
Cases that are non‑appealable
1.  Subject to paragraph 2, an appeal cannot be brought to the Court of Appeal in any of the following cases:
(a)where, by any written law for the time being in force, it is expressly declared that the judgment or order of the High Court is final or that no appeal lies from the judgment or order of the High Court;
(b)where the judgment or order is made by consent of the parties;
(c)where a Judge makes an order giving unconditional leave to defend any proceedings;
(d)where a Judge makes an order giving leave to defend any proceedings on condition that the party defending those proceedings pays into court or gives security for the sum claimed, except if the appellant is that party;
(e)where a Judge makes an order setting aside unconditionally a default judgment, regardless of how the default judgment was obtained (including whether by reason of a breach of an order of court or otherwise);
(f)where a Judge makes an order setting aside a default judgment on condition that the party against whom the judgment had been entered pays into court or gives security for the sum claimed, regardless of how the default judgment was obtained (including whether by reason of a breach of an order of court or otherwise), except if the appellant is that party;
(g)where a Judge makes an order refusing to strike out —
(i)an action or a matter commenced by a writ of summons or by any other originating process; or
(ii)a pleading or a part of a pleading;
(h)where a Judge makes an order giving or refusing further and better particulars;
(i)where a Judge makes an order giving leave to amend a pleading, except if —
(i)the application for such leave is made after the expiry of any relevant period of limitation current at the date of issue of the writ of summons; and
(ii)the amendment is an amendment to correct the name of a party or to alter the capacity in which a party sues, or the effect of the amendment will be to add or substitute a new cause of action;
(j)where a Judge makes an order refusing security for costs;
(k)where a Judge makes an order giving or refusing interrogatories.
2.  Paragraph 1 does not apply to the following decisions, judgments or orders:
(a)any decision, judgment or order of the Family Division of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction mentioned in section 23 of the Family Justice Act 2014 (Act 27 of 2014);
(b)any decision, judgment or order of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction of the High Court in any of the following circumstances:
(i)the hearing of any appeal from a District Court or Magistrate’s Court when exercising jurisdiction of a quasi‑criminal or civil nature in any family proceedings (not being probate proceedings), being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(ii)the hearing of any appeal or special case from the Tribunal for the Maintenance of Parents, being an appeal or a special case commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(iii)the hearing of any appeal from any contentious probate proceedings commenced in a District Court, being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 January 2015.
3.  In this Schedule —
“family proceedings” has the meaning given by section 2(1) of the Family Justice Act 2014;
“probate proceedings” has the meaning given by section 47(13) of the Family Justice Act 2014.
FIFTH SCHEDULE
Sections 34(2) and (4) and 83
Cases that are appealable only with leave
1.  Subject to paragraphs 4 and 5, an appeal may be brought to the Court of Appeal only with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal, in any of the following cases:
(a)where by any written law for the time being in force, it is expressly declared that the appeal may be brought only with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal, or that no such appeal is to be brought except with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal;
(b)where the only issue in the appeal relates to costs or fees for hearing dates;
(c)where a Judge in chambers makes a decision in a summary way on an interpleader summons where the facts are not in dispute;
(d)where a Judge makes an order refusing leave to amend a pleading, except if —
(i)the application for such leave is made after the expiry of any relevant period of limitation current at the date of issue of the writ of summons; and
(ii)the amendment is an amendment to correct the name of a party or to alter the capacity in which a party sues, or the effect of the amendment will be to add or substitute a new cause of action;
(e)where a Judge makes an order giving security for costs;
(f)where a Judge makes an order giving or refusing discovery or inspection of documents;
(g)where a Judge makes an order refusing a stay of proceedings;
(h)where a Judge makes an order at the hearing of any interlocutory application other than an application for any of the following matters:
(i)for summary judgment;
(ii)to set aside a default judgment;
(iii)to strike out an action or a matter commenced by a writ of summons or by any other originating process, a pleading or a part of a pleading;
(iv)to dismiss an action or a matter commenced by a writ of summons or by any other originating process;
(v)for further and better particulars;
(vi)for leave to amend a pleading;
(vii)for security for costs;
(viii)for discovery or inspection of documents;
(ix)for interrogatories to be varied or withdrawn, or for leave to serve interrogatories;
(x)for a stay of proceedings;
(i)where the appeal is from any decision, judgment or order of the High Court involving the exercise of its appellate civil jurisdiction in any of the following circumstances:
(i)the hearing of any appeal from a District Court or Magistrate’s Court when exercising jurisdiction of a quasi‑criminal or civil nature in any family proceedings (not being probate proceedings), being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(ii)the hearing of any appeal or special case from the Tribunal for the Maintenance of Parents, being an appeal or a special case commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(iii)the hearing of any appeal from any contentious probate proceedings commenced in a District Court, being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 January 2015.
2.  An appeal may be brought to the Court of Appeal only with the leave of a Judge of the Family Division of the High Court, or of the Court of Appeal, from any decision, judgment or order of the Family Division of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction mentioned in section 23 of the Family Justice Act 2014 (Act 27 of 2014).
3.  Section 34(2)(a) does not apply to any of the following cases:
(a)any case heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction under any written law which requires that case to be heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction;
(b)any case heard and determined by the Family Division of the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction;
(c)any family proceedings (not being probate proceedings) commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014 and heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction;
(d)any contentious probate proceedings commenced in the High Court before 1 January 2015 and heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction.
4.  Section 34(2)(a) and section 34(2)(b) read with paragraph 1(b) to (h) do not apply to any decision, judgment or order of the High Court involving the exercise of its appellate civil jurisdiction in any of the following circumstances:
(a)the hearing of any appeal from a District Court or Magistrate’s Court when exercising jurisdiction of a quasi‑criminal or civil nature in any family proceedings (not being probate proceedings), being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(b)the hearing of any appeal or special case from the Tribunal for the Maintenance of Parents, being an appeal or a special case commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(c)the hearing of any appeal from any contentious probate proceedings commenced in a District Court, being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 January 2015.
5.  Section 34(2)(a) and section 34(2)(b) read with paragraph 1(b) to (h) do not apply to any decision, judgment or order of the Family Division of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction mentioned in section 23 of the Family Justice Act 2014.
6.  In this Schedule —
“family proceedings” has the meaning given by section 2(1) of the Family Justice Act 2014;
“probate proceedings” has the meaning given by section 47(13) of the Family Justice Act 2014.”.
New Sixth Schedule
18.  The principal Act is amended by inserting, immediately after the Fifth Schedule, the following Schedule:
SIXTH SCHEDULE
Sections 30(2) and 83
Composition of court of appeal
when exercising civil jurisdiction
in certain matters
1.  Despite section 30(1), the Court of Appeal in the exercise of its civil jurisdiction is duly constituted for the purpose of hearing and determining any of the following matters if it consists of one Judge of Appeal:
(a)an application —
(i)to record a judgment, or an order, that is made by consent of the parties; or
(ii)to make an order that is incidental to any such judgment or order;
(b)an application to adduce further evidence in proceedings before the Court of Appeal;
(c)an application for costs, or any other matter that remains to be dealt with, after an application or appeal to the Court of Appeal is withdrawn.
2.  Despite section 30(1), the Court of Appeal in the exercise of its civil jurisdiction is duly constituted for the purpose of hearing and determining an application for any direction or order mentioned in section 36(1) if it consists of —
(a)one Judge of Appeal; or
(b)2 Judges of Appeal.
3.  Despite section 30(1), the Court of Appeal in the exercise of its civil jurisdiction is duly constituted for the purpose of hearing and determining any of the following matters if it consists of 2 Judges of Appeal:
(a)an application to extend the time for filing and serving a notice of appeal;
(b)an application to discharge or vary any direction or order made under section 36(1) by a Court of Appeal consisting of one Judge of Appeal;
(c)an application for leave to appeal to the Court of Appeal, whether under this Act or any other written law, or to extend time for applying for such leave;
(d)an application to the Court of Appeal for a stay of execution (whether pending or after the appeal) or a stay of proceedings under the decision appealed from;
(e)an appeal against an interlocutory judgment;
(f)an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after the hearing of an application for the admission of a person under section 15 of the Legal Profession Act (Cap. 161);
(g)an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after the hearing of an assessment of damages;
(h)an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after the hearing of a taking of accounts between parties;
(i)an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after any proceedings other than the trial or hearing of any action or matter commenced by any originating process.”.
Related amendment to State Courts Act
19.  The State Courts Act (Cap. 321) is amended by inserting, immediately after section 7, the following section:
State Court may conduct hearing through electronic means of communication
8.—(1)  Without limiting section 7, a State Court may conduct the hearing of any matter or proceeding through a live video link, a live television link or any other electronic means of communication.
(2)  Subsection (1) does not affect the operation of section 62A of the Evidence Act (Cap. 97) and section 281 of the Criminal Procedure Code (Cap. 68).”.
Saving and transitional provisions
20.—(1)  Despite section 3, section 21(1)(a) of the principal Act as in force immediately before the date of commencement of section 3 continues to apply to an appeal, from a decision of a District Court or Magistrate’s Court, that is commenced in the High Court before that date.
(2)  For a period of 2 years after the date of commencement of any provision of this Act, the Minister may, by regulations, prescribe such additional provisions of a saving or transitional nature consequent on the enactment of that provision as the Minister may consider necessary or expedient.